Heracles, the Hydra and Basic Hire Rates by Ian Miller

In Greek mythology the Hydra was a serpent-like water monster with many heads. For every head cut off it grew two more. It had poisonous breath and blood so virulent that even its tracks were deadly. Credit hire claims are like the Hydra – every time the appeal courts strike off a metaphorical head, another argument (or two) seems to emerge. In a claim for a car hired on credit, absent impe... [Continue Reading]

Records of Inquest: the conclusion is... use your boxes correctly and keep it succinct by Lisa Dobie

For those of you practising in coronial law, the Chief Coroner's Guidance No. 17 was published on 30 January 2015. It contains some useful and succinct guidance on short form conclusions and narrative conclusions, including: how and when they should be used (as alternatives or together); the correct approach to the three stages of the conclusion (i.e. fact finding, box 3 of the Record of Inques... [Continue Reading]

“ .. Friends, Romans, personal injury lawyers ...!” by Simon Readhead QC

Or so Mark Antony might have said if Shakespeare had been around to reflect on the amendments to the CPR which come into effect on 6 April 2015. All the talk is of the changes to Part 36. But what of the new Part 87 which is being introduced as part of the continuing drive to replace Latin terms with simpler English language.   I confess to a fondness for Roman law having been made to st... [Continue Reading]

Retiring gracefully ... and gradually? by Simon Readhead QC

Most personal injury lawyers think a lot about retirement. This can be their own, in my case usually when grappling with costs budgets, but is more likely to be that of the party whose claim they are advancing or opposing. The date of retirement is crucial to the value of a loss of earnings claim.   Most personal injury schedules claim full time working to age 68 or even 70. Most counter... [Continue Reading]

The global scope of employer's liability by Jack Harding

    It is trite law that an employer’s duty to its employees is non-delegable. The duty is to take reasonable care to see that the employee is not exposed to unnecessary risk. In the vast majority of cases, the scope and content of this duty will be easy to define, since the accident will have occurred on premises owned or controlled by the Defendant. In perhaps a minority of case... [Continue Reading]

Holding out for the Heroism Bill by James Cullen

The Social Action, Responsibility and Heroism Bill (dubbed by some the “Sarah Bill”) is being returned to the House of Commons, with amendments, following its final reading in the House of Lords on 6 January 2015. The much-maligned and exceptionally brief Bill seeks to introduce a requirement that courts deciding negligence and/or breach of statutory duty cases and in determining the s... [Continue Reading]

Railing against expanding highway authorities' duties of care by Andrew Spencer

  There is a very useful discussion in the recent case of Foulds v Devon County Council about the nature of a highway authority’s common law duty to road users.   The issue in the case was whether a highways authority had assumed a common law duty of care to road users in respect of railings erected on a low wall between the highway and a steep drop. A cyclist lost control and... [Continue Reading]

A prediction for 2015: costs budgeting is doomed by Ian Miller

With the new year come predictions as to what will happen in 2015. Tom Standage of the Economist predicts that our smart phones will become smarter with the use of anticipatory or predictive intelligence - our phones may suggest we leave earlier for a dinner date if the traffic is bad or offer sending a message to other participants if we are late for meetings. Paul Lee of Deloittes predicts drone... [Continue Reading]

Application of Procedural Rules and Litigants-in-Person by Thomas Crockett

There can be little doubt that modern litigation involves the increased presence of people representing themselves in court. Particularly amongst some kindlier judges (in all courts) there could be said frequently to be a culture of benevolence towards such litigants-in-person when it comes to non-compliance with the Civil Procedure Rules and other procedural rules.   This can lead to si... [Continue Reading]

Prosecution of PI Fraud by Thomas Crockett

Any regular reader of the PIBlawg will be aware that I have an interest in fraudulent personal injury claims, being involved as I am in numerous cases where a vast range of fraud is alleged by Defendant parties (also see http://bit.ly/1vRcuWT; http://bit.ly/1znwXHI; http://bit.ly/1GokHKm).   In recent years there appears to have been a change in culture of insurers, who are far more prep... [Continue Reading]

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