piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

B v Ministry of Defence [2010] EWCA Civ 1317

  Section 33 and causation: Personal injury claims issued three years after the date of knowledge are time barred pursuant to section 11 and 14 of the Limitation Act 1980. However, it is often assumed that where a fair trial can still go ahead, the Court will most likely dis-apply the three limitation period and exercise its discretion under section 33 of the same Act. The cogency of the ... [More]

No liability for stressful disciplinary process: Dermott v LB Harrow

In a judgment handed down on 21 January 2011, McKay J dismissed a claim for psychiatric injury suffered by the claimant during a protracted disciplinary process. The claimant alleged a large number of breaches of his employer’s duty to take reasonable care to protect his health and a breach of the implied term of trust and confidence. The judge applied the guidance in Eastwood v Magnox [2003... [More]

Part 36 and interest on future losses

A claimant beats his Part 36 offer and gets substantial damages for future losses. Under CPR 36.14(3)(a) he's entitled to "interest on the whole or part of any sum of money (exlcuding interest) awarded at a rate not exceeding 10% above base rate for some or all of the period starting with the date on which the relevant period expired" (emphasis added). Does any sum of money include future losse... [More]

Risk versus Social Benefit - Barnes v Scout Association

Barnes v Scout Association [2010] EWCA Civ 1476     Mark Barnes was a strapping 13 year old. He played rugby for his county. In Ward LJ’s words “he was the least likely boy to need wrapping in cotton wool”. But Mark was injured whilst playing a game called “Objects in the Dark” with his local Scout troop. This was rather like musical chairs. In... [More]

(Attempted) Murder on the Dancefloor

Everett & Another v Comojo UK Ltd t/a the Metropolitan & Others: Liability of nightclub for assault   Judgment was handed down in the Court of Appeal on 18 January 2011 in the above case.  The case concerned an assault in a upmarket private members nightclub.  A waitress working in the club was allegedly assaulted by two patrons.  Another patron, and regul... [More]

Mind Your Fingers!

Ashford v Somerset County Council 22 November 2010, Yeovil County Court (Unreported)    Finger trapping case raises interesting questions concerning a School's duty to its pupils regarding doors  The Claimant was a 9 year old primary school student. His last lesson  was a drama class with around 15 other pupils. When the lesson ended, his teacher asked the class to line up... [More]

Should sperm donors be entitled to claim joint residency?

On 15 November 2010, the Court of Appeal adjudicated a custody battle over two children conceived by artificial insemination by a lesbian couple using donated sperm (the case of T v T). In this unusual case, the sperm donor had parental responsibility for the children and applied for further access. In June 2010, a Court at first instance granted the father joint residency, which allowed him ... [More]

No jury trial for personal injuries caused by police

According to the authors of both Clerk and Lindsell on Torts and Halsbury’s Laws of England, the tort of false imprisonment is committed whenever a person is unlawfully subjected to a total restraint of movement, no matter how short the period of restraint. Does that mean that if a claimant is restrained during the period of an assault, he can claim for damages for false imprisonment (and so... [More]

Emergency Services: Liability under the Human Rights Act

Following Lord Young’s report, personal injury funding is likely to be reduced and, as a consequence, claims under the HRA against emergency services may become more frequent, according to Edward Bishop who recently spoke on the topic at the Personal Injury Bar Association Winter Conference. One advantage of the HRA is that, in contrast to the common law, which adopts different approac... [More]

Quality Care Commission Survey of Maternity Services

Maternity services are improving, however there is still more to be done with regards postnatal care, according to a survey by the Quality Care Commission. In December the Quality Care Commission released the results of its latest survey. More than half of all women in England who gave birth in February 2010 responded to the survey, of which 25,000 received maternity services from the 144 NHS Tru... [More]