piBlawg

the personal injury and clinical negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

T’is the season to be techie ….!

This is the time of year for families …. and for gadgets. Lots of them! In particular, smartphones. An average 65% of children in the UK aged between 8 and 11 now have their own smartphone.   This figure rises to 90.5% in Newcastle making it the smartphone capital of the UK for children. This compares with 55.2% in London and only 40% in Brighton and Hove.   All this and more is contained in a survey by Internet Matters (www.internetmatters.org) which also revealed that 72% of parents will have bought tech gifts for their children this year.   For those looking forward to getting back to drafting or responding to schedules of aids and equipment in the New Year the challenge is to wise up and become more e-savvy about equipment claims in 2016.   Also out before Christmas was the latest statistical bulletin from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) (www.ons.gov.uk) on families and households in the UK in 2015.   As a result, those grappling with accommodation claims in 2016 may need to reconsider some of the assumptions often made in schedules and counter schedules, for example, that a person will cohabit throughout his or her life and about the likely age at which a person is likely to leave home.   Although in 2015 in the UK there were 12.5 million people living in a married or civil partner couple family and a further 3.2 million living as a cohabiting couple family there were also 7.7 million people in the UK in 2015 living alone. The largest change – and, according to the ONS, one that is statistically significant - is in people aged between 45 and 64 where the number living alone has increased by 23% between 2005 and 2015.   In 2015 around 40% of young adults in the UK aged between 15 and 34 were still living with their parents. In 1996 around 5.8 million people aged between 15 and 34 in the UK lived with their parents. This figure increased to a peak of 6.7 million in 2014 and has remained at around 6.6 million in 2015.   Looking forward, Christmas wish lists are likely to continue to be dominated by tech gadgets and devices. However, in 2016, at least for parents, the focus may be less on paper chains and party games and more on parental controls and privacy settings.   A Happy New Year to all our readers!

Retiring gracefully ... and gradually?

Most personal injury lawyers think a lot about retirement. This can be their own, in my case usually when grappling with costs budgets, but is more likely to be that of the party whose claim they are advancing or opposing. The date of retirement is crucial to the value of a loss of earnings claim.   Most personal injury schedules claim full time working to age 68 or even 70. Most counter schedules contend for retirement at age 65.   However, new research shows the way people view retirement is changing. Nearly two-thirds of people aged over 50 no longer think that working full time and then stopping work altogether is the best way to retire and around half would still like to be in work aged between 65 and 70.   YouGov surveyed more than 2,000 retired and non-retired people aged over 50.   https://yougov.co.uk/news/2014/11/05/concept-gradual-retirement-attracts-non-retired-ad/   The survey showed:   39% of over 50s not currently retired said that working part time or flexible hours before stopping work altogether would be the best way to retire. 48% of those under 65 and not currently retired would still like to be in work between 65 and 70. 36% of retirees say their advice to others would be to “consider switching to flexible or part time work for a period first” before stopping work altogether. 33% of those over 70 and still working said they did so because they enjoyed it.   The survey also suggests that some non-retired people over 50 both in and out of work were ready to learn new skills. Nearly half (47%) said they were interested in attending training courses to learn new or to update existing skills.   There are lessons here for both schedulers and counter schedulers. An absolute retirement age of 65, 68 or even 70 may now be unrepresentative. Gradual retirement is increasingly the trend at least in England and Wales.   In “The Later Years of Thomas Hardy” (Macmillan, 1930), Florence Emily Hardy reports the author’s observation that:   “The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job”.   I cannot promise still to be working beyond age 70. If I am, I can promise it will not be on costs budgets!  

Want to live longer … Move to Dorset!

Dorset is the birthplace of Thomas Hardy. Hardy loved the Christmas season and his novels, short stories and poems are full of references to it. My favourite Hardy novel “Under the Greenwood Tree” begins on Christmas Eve.  Dorset now has another attraction. It has the highest average life expectancy in the UK with men living to 83 years and women to 86.4 years. The Office for National Statistics has recently published its “Interim Life Tables, England and Wales, 2010-2012”.  http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-325699 These will be of interest to personal injury lawyers tempted to spend part of the Christmas period doing schedules or counter schedules. The headline points are that life expectancy in England and Wales has increased by more than a year in the past decade. However, the distribution of life expectancy across England is still characterised by a north-south divide with people in local areas in the north generally living shorter lives than those in the south. Boys are also narrowing the gap on girls when it comes to life expectancy in England and Wales. The ONS reports that baby girls born 30 years ago were expected to live six years longer than boys. Now it is less than four. This is because fewer men now work in heavy manual labour which historically had high death rates as a result of industrial accidents. They are also less prone to diseases that affected workers in certain industries, such as mining. In contrast, women who might once have stayed at home have taken on the stress of working. In addition, many women also care for children or ageing relatives or both as well as providing for their family financially. Kathy Gyngell, a research fellow with the Centre for Policy Studies, observes that   “We are increasingly seeing more women suffering from what were once male diseases – heart disease, high blood pressure, even baldness”. In case you were wondering men in Blackpool have the lowest average life expectancy at 73.8 years while the lowest for women is in Manchester at 79.3 years. As well as Christmas, Thomas Hardy also had a view on old age: “The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job”. Florence Emily Hardy, “The Later Years of Thomas Hardy” (Macmillan, 1930). To late developers everywhere, Happy Christmas!

Are you one of the Plebs?

Do you remember Barry Bucknell?   He was the London builder who became one of the first television DIY experts. He presented the television series “Barry Bucknell's Do It Yourself" which at its peak attracted 7 million viewers. Most of what I know about Formica I learnt from Barry.   I was thinking of Barry when I was reading a Schedule which included a claim for “DIY”. In this case the Claimant valued the loss of his ability to carry out “decorating, redecorating, maintenance and gardening” work at £1,750 per year until he was aged 70 and at £875 from age 70 onwards.   Nearly all Schedules now include a claim of this type and these are rarely challenged. Does every Claimant really have “DIY skills” worth nearly £35 per week? If so, perhaps Barry and all the other television DIY and makeover experts who have followed him over the years really have improved the nation’s practical skills. Then I read about the “WorldSkills Olympics” which is taking place at the ExCeL arena in London during October 2011. This is a competition to demonstrate proficiency in basic tasks such as changing a tyre, putting up shelves, wall papering a room and even changing a plug. The competition is being organised by UK Skills (http://www.ukskills.org.uk/) because apparently too many of us are “Plebs”. Plebs are people lacking everyday basic skills and there are rather a lot of us according to a recent survey. There is also a developing generation gap in that 72% of 18 to 24 year olds are able to join a Wi-Fi network but only 9% are capable of poaching an egg. Armed with this information I shall look at DIY claims more carefully in the future to make sure that Claimant in question really is a “Bucknell” and not one of the “Plebs”.